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Fiber Art Master Works in Central California

FIBER ART EXHIBITION at the FRESNO ART MUSEUM
May 20 to August 28, 2016

Thursday to Sunday, 11 am to 5 pm

2233 North First Street, Fresno, CA 93703

559-441-4221

Click here for directions, visitor information, hours, and admission.

Read the Fresno Bee’s excellent review of Fiber Art Master Works here.

Jeff Sanders' "Earth View II" draws visitors in to the beautifully curated Fiber Art Master Works exhibition at Fresno Art Museum, summer 2016.

Jeff Sanders’ “Earth View II” draws visitors in to the beautifully curated Fiber Art Master Works exhibition at Fresno Art Museum, summer 2016.

 

CaptionLeslie Rinchen-Wongmo with her "Three Mongolians" at the Fiber Art Master Works opening, May 20 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo with her “Three Mongolians” at the Fiber Art Master Works opening, May 20, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

 

Textile masterpieces by Michael Rohde, John Nava, Patti Handley, Audrey Sanders, Robin Clark, and  Joan Schulze impress with color, texture, and meaning at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

Textile masterpieces by Michael Rohde, John Nava, Patti Handley, Audrey Sanders, Robin Clark, and Joan Schulze impress with color, texture, and meaning at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

 

Textile masterpieces by Michael Rohde, Patti Handley, and Michelle Kingdom impress with color, texture, and meaning at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum. Through the doorway on the left, you can glimpse Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo's "Buddha Shakyamuni and the Six Supports" attracting exhibition visitors' curiosity and fascination with its intricacy.

Textile masterpieces by Michael Rohde, Patti Handley, and Michelle Kingdom impress with color, texture, and meaning at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum. Through the doorway on the left, you can glimpse Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo’s “Buddha Shakyamuni and the Six Supports” attracting exhibition visitors’ curiosity and fascination with its intricacy.

 

Michael Rohde shows the vivid potential of natural dyes in this weaving. The former bio-chemist dyes his own yarns before setting his loom and weaving by hand.

Michael Rohde shows the vivid potential of natural dyes in this weaving at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum. The former bio-chemist dyes his own yarns before setting his loom and weaving by hand.

 

This Navajo weaving by Martha Smith recalls the New York skyline, complete with Twin Towers, before disaster struck on September 11, 2001. Fresno Art Museum, Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

This Navajo weaving by Martha Smith recalls the New York skyline, complete with Twin Towers, before disaster struck on September 11, 2001. Fresno Art Museum, Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

 

Jeff Sanders' "Full Moon" holds a wall of its own and glows with perfect lighting at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

Jeff Sanders’ gently curved “Full Moon” holds a wall of its own and glows with perfect lighting at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

 

Michelle Kingdom's poignant embroideries are the only small pieces in the Fiber Art Master Works show. Their intimacy is touches deep. In the background, we see Ramekon O’Arwisters crochet work. Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016

Michelle Kingdom’s poignant embroideries are the only small pieces in the Fiber Art Master Works show. Their intimacy is touches deep. In the background, we see Ramekon O’Arwisters crochet work. Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016

 

A variety of surfaces by Patti Handley, Audrey Sanders, Robin Clark, and Joan Schulze show the remarkably diverse potential of fiber at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

A variety of surfaces by Patti Handley, Audrey Sanders, Robin Clark, and Joan Schulze show the remarkably diverse potential of fiber at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

 

Two of my favorite pieces at Fiber Art Master Works: Lia Cook's "Traces Past" (shown next to her "Doll Face") and Michael Rohde's "From My House to Your Homeland." Exhibition runs May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

Two of my favorite pieces at Fiber Art Master Works: Lia Cook’s “Traces Past” (shown next to her “Doll Face”) and Michael Rohde’s “From My House to Your Homeland.” Exhibition runs May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

 

The artistic power and diversity of weaving by Michael Rohde, John Nava, and Patti Handley at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

The artistic power and diversity of weaving by Michael Rohde, John Nava, and Patti Handley at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

 

IMG_0806Crochet creativity by Ramekon O’Arwisters at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

Crochet creativity by Ramekon O’Arwisters at Fiber Art Master Works, May 20 thru Aug 28, 2016 at the Fresno Art Museum.

 

The unexpected power of ordinary materials (canvas, wood, and chicken wire) in this work by Audrey Sanders at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

The unexpected power of ordinary materials (canvas, wood, and chicken wire) in this work by Audrey Sanders at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

 

Traditional and contemporary works in Tibetan Appliqué by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

Traditional and contemporary works in Tibetan Appliqué by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

 

Detail of the textural quality of Buddha Appliqué by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

Detail of the textural quality of Buddha Appliqué by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

 

Detail of the haunting depth of "Traces Past" by Lia Cook at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

Detail of the haunting depth of “Traces Past” by Lia Cook at Fiber Art Master Works, Fresno Art Museum, May 20 to Aug 28, 2016.

 

 

FIBER ART MASTER WORKS at the FRESNO ART MUSEUM
May 20 to August 28, 2016

Thursday to Sunday, 11 am to 5 pm

2233 North First Street, Fresno, CA 93703

559-441-4221

Click here for directions, visitor information, hours, and admission.

Read the Fresno Bee’s excellent review of Fiber Art Master Works here.

 

 
Purchase Artwork & Prints   |  Commission Your Own   |   Online Courses

Special, Two-of-a-Kind, Framed Prints

(SOLD)

 

I’m offering two very special framed prints of my Big Buddha thangka at 50% off. These two prints feature my most elaborate thangka, the one His Holiness the Dalai Lama praised, surrounded by a brocade-covered mat. Update: The blue one has sold. The larger, gold one is still available.)

Inside each frame, below the print, I’ve hand-stitched a silk flower that recalls the original work.

Professionally matted and framed, these are two truly fine and beautiful pieces.

They were originally priced at $1495 for the one in blue brocade (SOLD) and $1995 for the one in gold brocade (29″ x 39″, STILL AVAILABLE). They are now $747 and $997, respectively. They will make a stunning addition to any room or altar.

Send me an email if you’d like to come to the studio to see them or if you know you want one for your home.

 
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Emperors, Lamas, and Silk: the Origin of Fabric Thangkas

This article originally appeared on Buddhistdoor Global on April 8, 2016.

Thangka paintings are Tibet’s most plentiful and portable form of sacred art. Less known and rarely seen are the highly prized appliqué thangkas. In fact, when I first discovered them in 1992 and expressed an interest in learning to make them, few Tibetans in Dharamsala had ever seen one.

A thangka is a two-dimensional, rollable form of art—a scroll—illustrated with images of spiritual masters, enlightened beings, role models, and symbols of our Buddha nature. In most thangkas, the picture is painted on cotton canvas and then framed in brocade fabric. In some thangkas, however, not only the frame but the picture itself is constructed from fabric.

FIG 1 Green Tara. China, 13th century, kesi (slit tapestry). Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. From studyblue.com

FIG 1 Green Tara. China, 13th century, kesi (slit tapestry). Asian Art Museum of
San Francisco. From studyblue.com

Guhyasamaja-Akshobhyavajra. China, Yongle period, 1416–19, silk embroidery. Potala Palace, Lhasa. From asianart.com

Guhyasamaja-Akshobhyavajra. China, Yongle period, 1416–19, silk
embroidery. Potala Palace, Lhasa. From asianart.com

The earliest known textile thangkas were 13th-century embroideries and tapestries produced in China on the basis of Tibetan paintings. Within a century or two, thangkas of hand-stitched silk appliqué were being created inside Tibet. No one knows for sure how this artistic evolution occurred, but it was undoubtedly an outgrowth of complex relationships among the nations of central and eastern Asia in the first half of the second millennium.

Over the centuries, power in this area changed hands many times. At times, the Mongols held sway over the whole region, while in other periods, the Chinese or Manchu had control. And from 1038–1227, the Tangut empire was an important force in what is today northwest China. Often, the nation which held temporal power looked to Tibetan lamas for spiritual guidance.

Chinese silk played an important role in managing and expressing these relationships. Silk came into Tibet as imperial tribute and commercial trade from at least as early as the Tang dynasty (618–907) and perhaps much earlier. A Sino-Tibetan treaty from 760 records an annual tribute of fifty thousand “pieces” of silk from the Chinese emperor to the Tibetan court at Lhasa (Reynolds 1995, 146).

The only indigenous weaving materials in Tibet were wool and yak hair. Silk was significantly more precious. In fact, silk was used as a currency. The price of a horse, for example, is recorded as having been anywhere from twenty to forty bolts of silk, depending on the quality of the horse and the time period (Reynolds 1995, 146 and 1997, 188).

In an article on patronage and religious practice in China and Tibet, Valrae Reynolds (former curator of Asian art at the Newark Museum and one of the few people to have written about Tibetan appliqué) describes the flourishing of artistic activity from the 11th to 13th centuries, as religious teachers founded monasteries with the support of “princely” families. From documents of this period, it emerges that “one of the popular ways to gain religious merit was to donate fine silk for the use of an esteemed teacher of a Buddhist monastery” (Reynolds 1997, 189). In this way—through tribute, commerce, and investment—silk satins, damasks, and brocades began to fill the treasuries of Tibet.

When the Mongols took over, consolidating control of China after 1279, they adopted many aspects of the destroyed Tangut court’s religious connection with Tibet, giving lamas great power over religious and cultural affairs and promoting artistic ventures that incorporated Tibetan Buddhist themes and styles. The use of silk to create sacred art grew out of these fluctuating Tangut-Mongol-Tibetan-Chinese interconnections.

It was during this period that textile copies of Tibetan paintings began to be produced in China, using Chinese techniques of weaving and embroidery. Reynolds notes that these silken images held “greater cachet than the paintings they were copied from” (Reynolds 1995, 147).

Achala. China, c. 1300, kesi (slit tapestry). Tibet Museum, Lhasa. From asianart.com

Achala. China, c. 1300, kesi (slit tapestry). Tibet Museum,
Lhasa. From asianart.com

Vajrapani. China, 14th century, kesi (slit tapestry). Rubin Museum of Art. From tumblr.com

Vajrapani. China, 14th century, kesi (slit tapestry). Rubin Museum of Art. From
tumblr.com

Art historian Michael Henss explains that these early “pictorial embroideries, tapestries, and brocades fall in between established art historical domains in two ways: they cannot be classified as paintings, nor are they textiles in the usual sense; Chinese by technique and origin, but Tibetan by subject and composition, [they were] presented by the imperial court to Tibetan religious officials and visitors, to their monastic enclaves in China and monasteries in Tibet . . .” (Henss 1997, 206). Henss also writes: “From the historical background, the regular flow of Tibetan art to China and Chinese art to Tibet between the late thirteenth and the late fifteenth centuries seems still to be underestimated” (Henss 1997, 214).

At some point, probably in the 14th century, the Tibetans were sufficiently inspired by the Chinese textile interpretations of their paintings to begin creating their own original textile masterpieces. To do so, they employed indigenous appliqué techniques, which were already being used to embellish ritual dance costumes, saddle blankets, and throne covers and to decorate the colorful tents and awnings that dotted the landscape for festivals and picnics. In collaboration with Tibet’s greatthangka painters, the country’s finest tailors were able to adapt these techniques to the more delicate and sacred imagery of thangkas.

Tibetan tents decorated with appliqué near Litang, eastern Tibet. From richandyon.com, 2006

Tibetan tents decorated with appliqué near Litang, eastern Tibet. From
richandyon.com, 2006

Tibetan ritual dance costume decorated with appliqué, Drikung Kyobpa Choling Tibetan Meditation Center, Escondido, California, 2012. Image courtesy of the author

Tibetan ritual dance costume decorated with appliqué, Drikung Kyobpa
Choling Tibetan Meditation Center, Escondido, California, 2012. Image
courtesy of the author

Textual records indicate that several giant appliqué thangkas were made in the early 15th century at Gyantse monastery in Tibet (Henss 1997, 214). And in 1468, the great thangka painter Menla Dhondup was commissioned by the first Dalai Lama to create a giant silk image of the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni, for display on the nine-story thangka wall of Tashilhunpo monastery. The wall was specially built for the occasional display of giant thangkas before crowds of devotees.

Monumental thangka depicting the Buddha of the Future, Maitreya, flanked by the Eighth Dalai Lama, Jamphel Gyatso, and his tutor, Yongtsin Yeshe Gyaltsen. Commissioned by the Eighth Dalai Lama for the benefit of his tutor and the posterity of the Buddhist faith. 1793, silk appliqué, Norton Simon Museum. From threadsofawakening.com

Monumental thangka depicting the Buddha of
the Future, Maitreya, flanked by the Eighth Dalai
Lama, Jamphel Gyatso, and his tutor, Yongtsin
Yeshe Gyaltsen. Commissioned by the Eighth
Dalai Lama for the benefit of his tutor and the
posterity of the Buddhist faith. 1793, silk appliqué,
Norton Simon Museum. From
threadsofawakening.com

Appliqué thangka production increased in the 16th century and spread throughout the region in the 17th and 18th centuries. Eventually, appliqué thangkas were being produced not only in Tibet itself, but also in the neighboring countries of Mongolia, Bhutan, and Ladakh.

Many of Tibet’s appliqué thangkas were destroyed during the 1950s and ‘60s, along with so many monasteries, texts, and cultural assets. For a few decades, this art form became largely dormant as Tibetans re-established themselves in exile and religion was suppressed within Tibet. In recent years, however, a thriving production has re-emerged among the exile community in India and Nepal, and some large appliqué thangkas have also been made within Tibet itself, including the giant Tsurphu thangka project managed by Terris and Leslie Nguyen Temple.

Karma Gadri thangka at Tsurphu Monastery, created by thangka artists Terris and Leslie Nguyen Temple in collaboration with the White Conch factory in Lhasa from 1992–94 and displayed at the annual event of Saga Dawa. From leslienguyentemple.com

Karma Gadri thangka at Tsurphu Monastery, created by thangka artists Terris and Leslie Nguyen Temple in collaboration with the White Conch factory in Lhasa from 1992–94 and displayed at the annual event of Saga Dawa. From leslienguyentemple.com

Tibetan women working on the giant thangka. As the image grew in size, a gymnasium was used to assemble the completed parts. Image courtesy of Leslie Nguyen Temple

Tibetan women working on the giant thangka. As the image grew in size, a gymnasium was used to assemble the completed parts. Image courtesy of Leslie Nguyen Temple

The prestige of fabric thangkas that began with Chinese textiles based on Tibetan paintings continues today with the uniquely Tibetan appliqué form. In the 2008 documentary Creating Buddhas: the Making and Meaning of Fabric Thangkas, Tibetologist Glenn Mullin notes, “For us, painting and sculpture are the two finest forms of art, but for Tibetans appliqué and embroidery are an even higher art.” Valrae Reynolds concurs by saying, “It’s kind of counterintuitive to the Western idea where painting and sculpture is high art and something made out of textile is craft. But in the Tibetan sense, an appliquéd thangka is the most wonderful, highest thing that you can create.”

His Holiness the Dalai Lama with the author and one of her appliqué thangkas, Dharamsala, 1997. Image courtesy of the author

His Holiness the Dalai Lama with the author and one of her appliqué thangkas,
Dharamsala, 1997. Image courtesy of the author

As an American woman, privileged to have learned this ancient, interculturally generated textile tradition from Tibetans in India, I am honored to carry it forward into the 21st century and, with the support of my Tibetan teachers and colleagues, to expand its reach into the Western world.

Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo is a textile artist, teacher, and caretaker of the sacred Tibetan tradition of silk appliqué thangka. Trained by two of the finest living masters of this rare art form, she stitches pieces of silk into fabric mosaics that bring the transformative figures of Buddhist meditation to life. Encouraged by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to make this art relevant across religions and cultures, Leslie created the Stitching Buddhas Virtual Apprentice Program to help women around the world integrate their spiritual and creative paths. She is a member of the Dakini As Art Collective and author of the forthcoming book, Threads of Awakening: the Sacred Power of Tibetan Textile Art.

 

References

Henss, Michael. 1997. “The Woven Image: Tibeto-Chinese Textile Thangkas of the Yuan and Early Ming Dynasties.” In Chinese and Central Asian Textiles: Selected articles from Orientations 1983-1997, 206–19. Hong Kong: Orientations Magazine Ltd.

Reynolds, Valrae. 1995. “The Silk Road: From China to Tibet – and Back.” In Chinese and Central Asian Textiles: Selected articles from Orientations 1983-1997, 146–53. Hong Kong: Orientations Magazine Ltd.

———. 1997. “Buddhist Silk Textiles: Evidence for Patronage and Ritual Practice in China and Tibet.” In Chinese and Central Asian Textiles: Selected articles from Orientations 1983-1997, 188–99. Hong Kong: Orientations Magazine Ltd.

Creating Buddhas: the Making and Meaning of Fabric Thangkas. 2008. DVD, directed by Isadora Gabrielle Leidenfrost. Madison, WI: Soulful Media.

 
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What is a Thangka? Tibet’s Sacred Portable Art

As a maker of appliqué thangkas and other artworks based on Tibetan appliqué, I’m often asked, “What exactly IS a thangka?”

Thangka is a Tibetan term for one of Tibet’s most plentiful and portable forms of sacred art. Some say the word thangka means “something that rolls up,” while others hypothesize that the word derives from thang-yig, which means “written record.” In this view, a thangka could be considered a pictorial or graphic record. Regardless of the etymology, the word “thangka” refers to a two-dimensional, rollable form of art—a scroll—illustrated with images of spiritual masters, teachers, enlightened beings, role models, and symbols of our buddha nature.

Gangteng Rinpoche teaching before a large appliqué thangka by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo at Unity Church in Santa Barbara, CA in 2014

Gangteng Rinpoche teaching before a large appliqué thangka by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo at Unity Church in Santa Barbara, CA in 2014

The idealized figures depicted on thangkas can be viewed in at least three different ways:

  • as external entities — powerful, clear-seeing, compassionate guides, teachers, and helpers who can be called upon for support
  • as models of our own future, images of the enlightened beings we will become when we’ve reached the destination of our spiritual journey
  • as a true reflection of our own ever-present nature—already buddha—the natural sky-like freedom of our minds clouded only by temporary and illusory veils

Any of these views can be true, depending on which lens you look through. Visualization practices can be used to rehearse and uncover the second and third views as well as to pay homage and receive blessings in the first view.

However they’re regarded, the powerful and inspiring figures pictured on thangkas carry enormous power to uplift and transform viewers’ minds. But a thangka is more than just this inspiring picture. It is a composite object composed of a picture, a soft frame, and other elements which aid and enhance its display.

Numerous books and articles discuss Tibetan iconography and tell stories of the sacred figures contained in thangkas. But few talk about the thangka as a physical object created by artists and craftspeople and used by ordinary people in their homes and temples.

The physical object called thangka has the following key characteristics:

  • Thangkas are pictorial — generally depicting spiritual figures and symbols.
  • Thangkas are two-dimensional — they’re not sculptures.
  • Thangkas are rollable — as opposed to wall paintings and sand mandalas and paintings in which canvas remains stretched on a wooden frame.
  • A thangka is more than just a sacred image — it is a composite object consisting of a painted, embroidered, or appliqué picture surrounded by a soft frame of fabric.

The picture part of most thangkas is painted (traditionally with mineral pigments but nowadays often with acrylic colors) on cotton canvas. Throughout the painting process, this canvas is stretched on a rigid wooden frame. When the painting is finished, the artist cuts the painted canvas free from its rigid stretcher and takes it to a specialized tailor who will mount it in brocade and assemble it in an integrated display-store-and-transport package.

Thangka Painting in Progress

Thangka Painting in Progress

Tiffani Gyatso, a member of the Dakini As Art collective, cuts her completed thangka painting from its stretcher frame. Next it will be framed in brocade. See more of Tiffani's artwork at tiffanigyatso.com.

Tiffani Gyatso, a member of the Dakini As Art collective, cuts her completed thangka painting from its stretcher frame. Next it will be framed in brocade. See more of Tiffani’s artwork at tiffanigyatso.com.

Special brocade is woven in Varanasi, India for framing thangkas.

Special brocade is woven in Varanasi, India for framing thangkas.

In some thangkas, not only the frame but the picture itself is constructed from fabric. These rare and precious thangkas are constructed from pieces of silk stitched together and embellished with embroidery and beads. This uniquely Tibetan textile art (usually called appliqué for lack of a better word) is the thangka tradition I studied.

The fabric mountings of early thangkas were often very simple. Rather than a rectangular frame that fully surrounds the picture, some were simple strips of blue cloth sewn along the upper and lower edges of the painting. The sides of the painting were left alone. In recent centuries, however, fabric frames have become more substantial and are usually made with multiple strips of multicolored brocade that surround the painting on all sides.

Guru Rinpoche appliqué thangka by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo. Notice the "rainbow" strips of brocade surrounding the image, the slat at the top of the frame, dowel at the bottom, and veil decoratively arranged at the top.

Guru Rinpoche appliqué thangka by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo. Notice the “rainbow” strips of brocade surrounding the image, the slat at the top of the frame, dowel at the bottom, and veil decoratively arranged at the top.

The strips that surround the picture most closely on all sides are called the “rainbow.” This reminds us that the beings depicted in the picture are beings of light, radiating non-stop goodness to us all. Most commonly, the innermost strip is red, the next strip (or the frame itself) is yellow or golden, and the outermost color (if included) is blue.

Sometimes, a rectangular piece of contrasting brocade, referred to as a door, is incorporated into a wide rectangle of brocade at the bottom of the frame, below the painting. There is a slat along the top edge of the fabric frame that spreads the thangka flat against the wall as it hangs. Narrow fabric strips or strings attached to this top edge serve the dual purpose of suspending the completed thangka from a hook for display and keeping it securely rolled while storing and carrying.

A rod or dowel is inserted in a sleeve along the bottom edge of the fabric frame to provide rigidity and weight so that the entire thangka—picture and frame—will hang smoothly. It also serves as the axis around which the thangka is rolled for storage and transport.

Rolling a thangka is a two-person job: one person holds the upper slat keeping the thangka taut as the second person holds the lower dowel and rolls the thangka around it. If you find yourself rolling a thangka, take care to hold your hands near the ends of the dowel so that you’re squeezing the brocade border, rather than the picture itself. Also take care to wrap the securing strips loosely around the brocade border so they don’t put pressure the picture itself.

A thangka is a rollable scroll and its traditional design is an integrated display-storage-transport system. Take care to secure ties around the brocade borders, so as not to damage the painting.

A thangka is a rollable scroll and its traditional design is an integrated display-storage-transport system. Take care to secure ties around the brocade borders, so as not to damage the painting.

Two additional features are usually incorporated into the thangka’s framing assembly: a veil (or drape) and ribbons. In Tibetan, the veil is called a “face-cover.” It is made of a soft, flowing silk fabric, much thinner than the heavy brocade of the frame. One end of the veil is attached at the upper edge of the frame, along the wooden slat. From there, it flows down to cover the entire face of the thangka. When the veil is lowered, it protects unauthorized eyes from viewing the image.

For display, this veil is gathered and tucked under a string that runs along the front of the upper slat. (Don’t use this string to hang the thangka. It’s only designed to hold the weight of the veil! See previous How to Hang a Thangka blog post for details.) Tucked up, the veil creates a decorative flourish above the picture, giving it a celebratory and honored look. It’s like arranging flowers and putting on our best clothes for a respected guest. For detailed instructions on how to arrange the thangka veil, visit my earlier blog post on the subject.

The ribbons can hang down in front of the thangka add to the celebration or they can be hidden behind. Known as “wind strips,” the ribbons were originally intended to hang in front of the painting only when the veil was lowered – they prevented the veil from blowing in the wind and thus revealing the image unintentionally.

When the veil is lowered over the face of the thangka, it protects unauthorized eyes from viewing the image. Gathered and arranged above the image, it creates a decorative flourish to honor the deity. For detailed instructions on how to arrange the thangka veil visit http://threadsofawakening.com/how-to-arrange-the-draped-silk-thangka-cover.

When the veil is lowered over the face of the thangka, it protects unauthorized eyes from viewing the image. Gathered and arranged above the image, it creates a decorative flourish to honor the deity. For detailed instructions on how to arrange the thangka veil visit http://threadsofawakening.com/how-to-arrange-the-draped-silk-thangka-cover.

This display-transport-storage integration has proved functional over centuries in the Tibetan monastic and semi-nomadic context, and is worthy of great admiration. In terms of conservation, however, the traditional package and its handling pose challenges for the long-term preservation of artworks. Though the upper slat and the lower rod do keep the thangka from bending and wrinkling when rolled, paintings are nonetheless stressed and gradually degraded with repeated rolling and unrolling. Flat methods of framing and storage are kinder to the artwork and should be considered in contexts where preservation is considered important.

Appliqué thangka by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo hanging in a private home in California.

Appliqué thangka by Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo hanging in a private home in California.

 
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Personally Sacred Art: a commission

We started with a weekend retreat exploring life themes, aspirations, gratitudes, and colors: flow, courage, gratitude, connection, delight, love, presence, openness, trust… narrow places, open spaces, yellow, gold, fish, lotus, water, flow…

Then I got to work, translating these ideas and feelings into form. Confronted along the way by limits in the materials and limits to my own experience, I collaborated with both to create something I hope will bring joy to its patron, my friend.

The pieces changed shape and color along the way, sometimes being unified as one piece, other times and ultimately standing as two separate but harmonious pieces. Hanging on driftwood collected from the beach near my studio, they’ll take this place with them to their new home.

Deborah, the patron and inspiration for this artwork

Deborah, the patron and inspiration for this artwork

 

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Deborah and I met for a day-long retreat in my studio, delving into color, letting the textures of the fabric evoke the textures of emotion. The safe space and unstructured nature of the day allowed themes of a unique and beautiful life to emerge.

 

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Sinking into the colors and subtle textures of life.

 

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Emotional and energetic qualities emerged — qualities that were familiar and abundant as well as those wanting to be cultivated, to be invited to take their place in the foreground of life.

 

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The Golden Fish resonated, as did the Lotus in context. Growing in water, swimming in water, navigating narrow places, emerging into open spaces.

 

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On my own, in the months after the retreat, the ideas and energies which emerged there guided my work with form and fabric.

 

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Silk satin from India, cotton quilt fabric from the local shop, horsehair wrapped with silk thread in Tibetan appliqué tradition. All working together with Deborah’s well-being in mind.

 

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I love when the pieces take on a life of their own!

 

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The flowers are so vibrant and alive. I know I made them but they feel as if they’ve grown organically, on their own, fertilized by my fingers and by Deborah’s intention.

 

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Bright lotus blossoms emerge from dark murky waters.

 

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Waters can be wavy.

 

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Clouds fill the sky, obscuring its clarity only temporarily, providing welcome cooling too and beautiful wonder.

 

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Initially, the sky was blue… but the contrasts felt too strong. I wanted a gentler effect.

 

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Rethinking colors…

 

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The fish swam in on their own.

 

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This gentle yellow sky won me over.

 

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Two fish emerged as individuals and came together to play.

 

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At various stages in the process, I envisioned the two panels of this piece hanging separately or being unified as one. At one point, I thought the panels would hang separately from a single rod and that the fish would dangle freely in between. It was fun (and sometimes scary) to let the work emerge as it wanted to. There was often a gap between what I envisioned in my head and what concrete reality was willing to accommodate… especially since I had to call on sewing and engineering skills I haven’t thoroughly honed.

 

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In the end, the two panels hang separately, each on its own piece of driftwood. This piece has a tunnel at the back to hold the rod. The fish swim through narrow places, and below the surface in hidden places, and emerge in the light of open spaces.

 

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This piece hangs from long loops sewn into the upper edge. At the last moment, a single fish found her way under the lily pad, courageously plumbing the depths of experience. This single fish tied the whole piece together for me.

 

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My seal and signature on the back.

 

Deb-23

With great appreciation to Deborah for allowing me to illustrate and support her life in this way. May these pieces bring you great joy!

 

 
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